"Japanese Studies in Europe: A Conference on Academic Exchange - Emergency Conference: The Evolvement of “Global Japanese Studies” after/with COVID-19 and the Significance of the Consortium - " (11 ~ 13 December 2020)

"Japanese Studies in Europe: A Conference on Academic Exchange - Emergency Conference: The Evolvement of “Global Japanese Studies” after/with COVID-19 and the Significance of the Consortium - " (11 ~ 13 December 2020)

From 11 to 13 December 2020, "Japanese Studies in Europe: A Conference on Academic Exchange - Emergency Conference: The Evolvement of “Global Japanese Studies” after/with COVID-19 and the Significance of the Consortium - " was held in a hybrid format. The onsite venue was the 1st Joint Research Room at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies (Nichibunken), and the online venue was Zoom. The conference language was Japanese (and English as necessary). With Prof. ARAKI Hiroshi (Chair, Committee for the Consortium for Global Japanese Studies [CGJS], Nichibunken) serving as the MC, the program on 11 December was delivered to both researchers and the general public. Following the introductory remarks from Prof. INOUE Shōichi (Director, Nichibunken) and Prof. ARAKI Hiroshi, Dr. IOKIBE Makoto (Chancellor, University of Hyogo) delivered the keynote lecture on international relations after COVID-19, and Prof. SEKINO Tatsuki (Nichibunken) delivered the keynote report on online research resources in the humanities. The keynote lecture and report introduced the important premises for the entire Conference, namely the status quo of international politics under COVID-19 and the problems concerning the use of online resources and databases in the humanities. The keynote lecture and report can be viewed online on the Youtube channel of Nichibunken (link: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLflDtPaoI4QmO6hlEYe7P6isSuwbpA7BH ).

 

On 12 and 13 December, with the participants limited only to researchers, panel presentations were held under the title of "Reports from Europe (1) (2)". Researchers from European countries presented on, and discussed, their respective research projects, the status quo of research under COVID-19, and the future collaboration and significance of CGJS. On 12 December, with Prof. YASUI Manami (Nichibunken) and Assit. Prof. SHIRAISHI Eri (Nichibunken) serving as the moderator, Dr. Edoardo GERLINI (Ca' Foscari University of Venice) presented on the limits and possibilities of Japanese studies as seen from Italy under COVID-19, Dr. SATO-ROSSBERG Nana (SOAS, University of London) on university education and research in the United Kingdom under and after COVID-19, Dr. IMONO Mika (University of Strasbourg) on what can and cannot be seen under COVID-19, Prof. Andreas Niehaus (Ghent University) on the status quo and future of Japanese studies in Belgium, and Prof. Marcus RÜTTERMANN (Nichibunken) on interdisciplinary research on the concept of conscience. On 13 December, with Prof. John BREEN (Nichibunken) serving as the moderator, the presentations were delivered mainly in English. Dr. Alan CUMMINGS (SOAS, University of London) presented on the 'Research on the impact of Covid-19 on Japanese performing arts & music', Dr. TOYOSAWA Nobuko (Czech Academy of Sciences) on 'Preliminary Thoughts about the Future from the Czech Republic', Dr. UMEMURA Yūko (University of Budapest [ELTE]) on the status quo of Japanese studies at ELTE, and Dr. Björn-Ole KAMM (Kyoto University) on the 'Methodological Concerns of Researching Larp and Educational Roleplay in Japan: The (Im) Possibilities of Remote Fieldwork'. The panel presentations were followed by comments from Prof. Kiri PARAMORE (National University of Ireland, Cork [University College Cork]) and Dr. FUJIMOTO Norimasa (Nichibunken), and by a roundtable discussion, in which each panelist had a chance to respond to the comments. Finally, Prof. TAKII Kazuhiro (Vice-Director, Nichibunken) delivered the closing remarks.

 

Many participants, both within and outside Japan, registered for the Conference; the cumulative number of participants was 151. During the Conference, the panelists proposed that the discussions on the future projects of CGJS and new forms of academic activities be continued, and that a working group be set up for this purpose. The Conference ended on a high note, having seen open-minded exchange of ideas among the participants and paved the way for further international discussions.

 

(Above)Keynote lecture on 11 December

 

(Above)Roundtable discussion on 13 December

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